Monthly Archives: February 2018

How To Quickly Increase Housing Inventory

 

Much has been written, spoken, debated, and lamented, about the lack of housing inventory in states from the Northeast, to the Midwest, to the West Coast.  There are myriad reasons and explanations for why, and most of them are probably accurate to some degree.  Many may even help alleviate the pressure on the market to stem the reduction in housing sales.  However, most of these ideas would take time.  While the Free Market is efficient in the long run… it is not necessarily so in the short run. It certainly is not responding quickly to the needs of first time home buyers in the market today.

When I was installed as President of the Rhode Island Association of REALTORS, I called upon my colleagues to Engage, and Inspire others to Engage, in order to remain relevant and productive in our current and ever-changing economy. Now is the time for us to Engage. Politically Engage .  This is also the time we should Inspire others, including consumers, to Engage.  We must inform our legislators and municipal officials that our economy needs to be unbridled by the regulatory restraints that are preventing First Time Home Buyers from participating in the American Dream of Home Ownership.  We have witnessed our national economy quickly rebound, with consecutive fiscal quarters of 3%+ growth, after the federal government eliminated numerous regulations which were restricting economic activity.  Why can that not be done at the state and municipal level so that builders can build houses that lower income families can afford?  Why should “the little guy”, who is too frequently an immigrant, not be able to buy a home because there is nothing available, or nothing is affordable?  This should be not be acceptable in the United States of America.  We must Engage with our legislators and municipal officials, to convince them that it is essential and vital that those at the lower income levels not be precluded from participating in the American Dream of Home Ownership.

As Architects of The American Dream, REALTORS® protect Private Property Rights.  The National Association of REALTORS® is against any obstacles to home ownership:

  • Unnecessary fees to buy a home,
  • Restrictive regulations/policies that infringe on the home-buying process,
  • Restrictive underwriting policies that may “freeze out” some from buying a home,
  • Increasing regulations and fees for consumers to retain ownership,
  • Anything else that may infringe or impede on the home sale process.

REALTORS® need to Engage, and lead the way for consumers to Engage, with the political process. Why shouldn’t everyone that qualifies for a mortgage be able to buy a home?  Why shouldn’t they participate in the American Dream of Home Ownership?  REALTORS® can make it happen so we should make it a reality.  If you want to Engage but don’t know how, email me at JosephLuca@remax.net.

Why Should I Use A Full Time REALTOR® To Sell My Home?

The short answer is: “You Don’t Know What You Don’t Know”

For the purposes of this discussion, when I refer to a REALTOR®, I am referring to a full-time, experienced REALTOR®, who averages at least 11 closings per year. For what it is worth, over 70% of RI REALTORS® do less than 5 transactions per year, which is why you should seek out an experienced full-time, REALTOR® to handle, what for most of us, is the largest financial transaction of our lives.

In essence, sellers are potentially exposing themselves to liabilities that may be unnecessary.  Either as it relates to disclosure of information, utilizing correct forms to expedite the transaction, and the general practice know-how that protects buyers and sellers from liability. Experienced full-time REALTORS® guide and control their client’s transaction so purchases and sales happen on schedule, and the buyer and seller can easily transition to the next stage of their life.  Additionally, REALTORS® know the market; we know houses, and we know sellers and buyers.  It’s our job.  Those of us that take our job seriously are continually learning, studying, reading and taking classes, so that we are aware of new regulations, financial instruments, and mortgage programs that best serve our clients.

As a full time REALTOR®, I make it my job to be aware of the latest financial incentives from housing authorities, tax incentive programs, mortgage programs from various lenders, and the latest guidelines from the government backed loan products (FHA and VA.) Being current on these programs gives me the tools to work with a full spectrum of clients, being able to assess their needs and help them best maximize goals.

REALTOR® Associations frequently change forms to accommodate the needs of members and consumers, so it is also part of my job to be aware of these changes and use the latest forms.  These forms frequently have time triggers with deadlines which, if missed, could cost the buyer or seller A LOT of money.  I take classes, attend webinars, and go to conferences to remain sharp and have the best skills, training, and tools for the benefit of my clients. I’m proud of this because it makes me extremely qualified to assist them with what I’ll mention again is likely the biggest financial investment of their lives.  This requires a large time-commitment and a significant amount of mental “focus.”  Most, if not all, of my top-producing colleagues approach their job in the same professional manner.

If a part-time REALTOR® has a “real” or “full-time” job, where would he/she find the time to do this?   I say this not to throw anyone under the bus.  I am not disparaging any REALTOR®; I am simply asking the aforementioned question.

These are just some things to think about as you consider hiring /working with a REALTORS®. I hope this post has giving you some food for thought, and I would love to discuss any of this with you and how it relates to your personal real estate needs and objectives. I look forward to hearing from you!

“Transfer of Wealth” – Just for the “Rich”?

Hopefully everyone will have a healthy and prosperous 2018.  It certainly seems to be shaping up that way so far.  The Dow, has broke 26,000, dropped below 25,000 and closed up over 300 points today.  We have experienced well in excess of $1 trillion of new wealth in the stock market in the past twelve months.  That is a good thing.  It is not just the wealthy, the stockbrokers, and other “big shots” that realize this increase in wealth from the stock market.  It is the little guy too.  The laborer/teacher/police officer/fireman who has paid into to a union pension reaps these benefits too.  The pensions invest in the stock market, bonds, real estate and other assets.  As do many mutual funds, some directly and some indirectly.  The word “Wealth” has, in many sectors of society, been erroneously associated with “evil”, “greed”, and other nefarious behavioral traits.  Increasing your wealth is not a bad thing for you, your family and your heirs.  Pretty much everyone wants to make it “easier” for our children to have a better life than we do.  Which brings us to the whole “transfer of wealth” issue.  Full disclosure, I was raised in a family that owned a small business.  My parents, aunts, and uncles all worked hard to assure that their families could be supported by the business.  Was it easy? I don’t think so; trying to sell musical instruments when interest rates were 18% must have been a challenge.  But they did it, they worked hard to increase the value of the business every year.  When the time comes that they pass on they will have the value of their business as a part of their estate. An estate that is composed of assets (typically cash, stocks, bonds, real estate) that are taxed annually.  Why does it make sense that upon their death, the estate should have to pay a tax on these assets yet again? This the government acting like a silent partner, reaping the rewards of decades of hard work without ever participating in the “work” aspect of the business.  So the “wealth” of a small family-owned business will be transferred to the heirs, after the proverbial “pound of flesh” is taken by the government.  We are not talking Kennedy/Rockefeller/Getty wealth, but small time family business “wealth”.  This scenario is repeated millions of times across the country with immigrant families, first and second generation American families, who work hard to build something of value that could be decimated by estate taxes.  This confiscation of wealth is not a good thing. It discourages hard work for the delayed gratification of leaving children and grandchildren in a better financial position than their predecessors. Is that good for America?